Posts Tagged ‘information graphics’

Summer in Wisconsin is not the same without Wisconsin Dells. I lived in the Badger State for several years, and not a summer went by without my family and me staying for a few days and nights in Wisconsin Dells, the “waterpark capital of the world.” The 4.4-square-mile city of Wisconsin Dells is home to the […]


Carbon dioxide is one of the many natural and man-made gases that build up in the atmosphere, forming a thick layer that affects the Earth in two ways, both detrimental to life in this planet: one, it blocks heat and energy coming from the sun; and two, it traps unwanted heat that would normally escape […]


As the weather warms up to usher in what could be a long, hot summer here in North America, people begin to flock to the beaches for a respite from the punishing heat and humidity. In this time of year, drownings are not uncommon. Drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury death for […]


SPRAWL REVISITED, PART 3 The urban sprawl series concludes with possible solutions that government policy makers and urban planners could explore to put a lid on the uncontrolled low-density migration of people and cars to the exurbs. One idea is nodal development where existing small communities are enlarged so they become self-contained cities that offer […]


SPRAWL REVISITED, PART 2 The second instalment of the Toronto Star series takes an in-depth look at the real costs of unchecked urban sprawl to the Southern Ontario region — chief among them increasing traffic congestion, longer times to get to work for the working population, elevated levels of pollution and the inevitable loss of […]


SPRAWL REVISITED, PART 1 Where there is urban congestion, plans and more plans to build more roads, highways and transport infrastructure would not be too far behind. This has always been the trend because governments see expansion as the natural — and as if the only — solution to urban congestion. But more roads leading […]


When snow started falling in Toronto and its suburbs in the morning of January 2, 1999, no one bothered to take notice. Snow — plenty of it — is a staple of Canadian winters, so everyone is used to it. But not everyone is used to having more than 40 cm. (16 inches) of the white […]