TRACKS OF A BYGONE ERA MADE BLUE COLLAR DREAMS COME TRUE

The once mighty Milwaukee Road spanned 16 states with 10,000 miles of track and boasted some of the most avant-garde streamlined passenger cars of the railroad era. But its busiest branch was the Beer Line, a freight track that served all the big breweries and many of Milwaukee’s industrial champions. The Beer Line encircled the city’s black community with a throbbing corridor of industry. Like the railroad, the thriving factories relied on African-American labor. And, like the railroad, many of these factories went out of business as the ’60s turned into the ’70s.

For a detailed look at this full-page graphic, please click here to view a PDF. This is a heavy file, so it might take a while to load the PDF.

Graphic by Alfred Elicierto, published in the Milwuaukee Journal Sentinel in 2005. Research by Steven Potter; original map references by Bob Kwas and Art Harnack; file photos from the Journal Sentinel archives.

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Also in this blog

What caused the collapse of Newfoundland fishing
Not a time for dictators
The cost of ever-expanding cities
The beginnings of the Amazon
The Oil Sands of Alberta

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Summer in Wisconsin is not the same without Wisconsin Dells.

I lived in the Badger State for several years, and not a summer went by without my family and me staying for a few days and nights in Wisconsin Dells, the “waterpark capital of the world.” The 4.4-square-mile city of Wisconsin Dells is home to the largest indoor and outdoor waterparks — among them Mount Olympus Water and Theme Park, Noah’s Ark, Kalahari Resort and Great Wolf Lodge.

This is a full-page graphic. For a more detailed view, please click here to view a PDF.

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Click here for more graphics

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The Dells is made up of a seven-mile-long network of rivers, lakes and canyons, as deep as 10 feet in some parts, carved into Cambrian sandstone by the glacial draining of Lake Wisconsin during the Cenozoic Age. Over the years, the city has parlayed its natural beauty into a giant, year-round amusement park, offering all sorts of thrills — from scenic river boat cruises and water rides in the summer to downhill skiing and snowmobile rides in the winter.

This graphic is about how these rivers, lakes, canyons and rocky cliffs — that give shape and texture to the area — evolved over time, forming what has become a geological gem of the American midwest. Almost 2 billion years ago, according to various sources, Wisconsin was literally under water. It was drenched in tropical climate in its position just south of the equator. Then about a billion years later, a large mass of rock broke out of water and rose above sea level to form the Wisconsin dome. Over time, after a series of freeze-and-thaw cycles, Wisconsin evolved into a dry land, then plant and animal life began to appear.

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INTERACTIVE: TURNING BACK THE ASIAN CARP

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Graphic by Alfred Elicierto. Published in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in 2007.

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Also in this blog:

How the Penumbra system works
The world’s richest oil deposit
The Haiti earthquake
Treating gunshot wounds
What animals mean when they ‘talk’


Carbon dioxide is one of the many natural and man-made gases that build up in the atmosphere, forming a thick layer that affects the Earth in two ways, both detrimental to life in this planet: one, it blocks heat and energy coming from the sun; and two, it traps unwanted heat that would normally escape into the atmosphere and away from the Earth were it not blocked by the layer of emitted gases. This phenomenon, called the ‘greenhouse effect,” is characterized by the rising temperature of the Earth’s surface, which drastically alters normal weather patterns and causes radical changes in ocean levels. This is “global warming,” and it is exactly what is happening today in many parts of the world.

The atmosphere is known to be capable of absorbing as much as 6.1 billion metric tons of man-made carbon dioxide emissions a year. But economic activity on Earth, which drive the increased burning of fossil fuels, raise the amount of carbon dioxide dumped annually into the atmosphere to about 3.2 billion metric tons more.

Click here to view interactive graphic.

 

One way to alleviate the unchecked rise in gas emissions — which, by itself, grew by 80% between 1970 and 2004 — is to trap carbon dioxide it at its source, extract it and  transport it to a safe location for storage, and eventually release it back into the atmosphere.

As of 2008, Wisconsin’s utility company, We Energies, has begun employing a process called “scrubbing” to extract carbon dioxide. It uses chilled ammonia to separate carbon dioxide from exhaust gas before carbon is shipped by pipeline to a storage area with vast underground sandstone formation.

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INTERACTIVE: TURNING BACK THE ASIAN CARP

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Interactive graphic by Alfred Elicierto. Related story and print graphic published in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in on Feb. 27, 2008.

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Also in this blog
How the Penumbra system works
The world’s richest oil deposit
The Haiti earthquake
Treating gunshot wounds
What animals mean when they ‘talk’


Here is an illustration on the perils of engaging in activities other than work during work hours — particularly surfing online sites that have nothing to do whatsoever with the job one is paid to do on company time. With the  coming of  the Internet in the early 1990s, and the ensuing widespread use of computers in all forms of business and economic activity also came all sorts of software that management could use to keep tabs on what workers are doing with company-supplied laptops and desktop computers while on the clock.

For a closer look at this illustration, click here to view a PDF.

Illustration by Alfred Elicierto, Knight Ridder Tribune Graphics (now known as McClatchy Tribune), produced and syndicated in November 2000.

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Also in this blog

What caused the collapse of Newfoundland fishing
Not a time for dictators
The cost of ever-expanding cities
The beginnings of the Amazon
The Oil Sands of Alberta


If it has a smell,  it can be sniffed — by a wasp. That’s the idea behind a gadget that employs specially trained wasps to smell, detect and identify certain chemicals the same way a trained dog does. A three-man team of wasp experts, one of them a biological engineer, has invented a software-run device that could  accurately identify  a chemical by the reaction of parasitic wasps to its unique scent. The gadget, now called the Wasp Hound, has plenty of potential applications, specially in the fields of security (explosives) and drug enforcement (illegal drugs and banned substances).

For a detailed look at this graphic, click  here to view a PDF.

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INFOGRAPHIC: SHOOTING AT IPPERWASH

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Graphic by Alfred Elicierto. Published in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on Nov. 14, 2005.

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Also in this blog:
Tragic end to a bombing raid
Treating gunshot wounds
Recalling the Nimrod air crash in Lake Ontario
What animals mean when they ‘talk’
A biodiesel project


Here’s a graphic about the different types of gamblers and what goes on in their minds while on the casino floor. The typical players usually belong to one of four distinct types based on whether they are introverts or extroverts, and whether they are high- or low-risk takers. These traits determine largely on what gaming table they would end up on and and the level of risk they would take.

For a detailed look at this graphic, click here to view a PDF. It might take some time to load the image because this is a big graphic that takes up plenty of memory.

Graphic by Alfred Elicierto. Designed and produced in 2011.

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INTERACTIVES: SHAPING THE AMAZON / TURNING BACK THE ASIAN CARP / HOME OF THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER

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Also in this blog:
Tragic end to a bombing raid
Newfoundland’s cod fishery killed by overfishing
What animals mean when they ‘talk’
Recalling the Nimrod air crash in Lake Ontario
Treating gunshot wounds


As the weather warms up to usher in what could be a long, hot summer here in North America, people begin to flock to the beaches for a respite from the punishing heat and humidity. In this time of year, drownings are not uncommon.

Drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury death for children ages 1 to 14,  and the fifth leading cause for all ages, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About half of all drownings occur in natural water settings, such as lakes, rivers and oceans. In 2007, at least 43% of all recreational water drownings in the U.S. happened in natural waters, more than twice the 19% rate of occurrence in swimming pools. Boating incidents accounted for 9%.

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For a detailed look at this graphic, click here to view a PDF.

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In Canada, about 500 people die every year from drowning, 69% of them occurring in natural waters. Swimming is the activity during which the largest number of  drownings occur.

Graphic by Alfred Elicierto. Published in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on July 9, 2003.

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Also in this blog:
Why cities are spreading to the countryside
Remembering Katrina of 2005
Tragic end to a bombing raid
Treating gunshot wounds
Crime news infographics as old as crime




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