Not a time for dictators

03Mar11

Click here to view interactive graphic.

On February 11, Hosni Mubarak stepped down as president of Egypt, putting an end to 30 years of autocratic rule over the world’s cradle of civilization. Mubarak was brought down by 18 days of non-stop anti-government protests fuelled largely by widespread discontent among his people and given a further boost by people’s access to information and social networking capabilities on the Internet.


 At the moment, authoritarian regimes in northern Africa and the Middle East are under a state of siege. A powerful wave of change is threatening otherwise deeply entrenched dictators — from the jungles of Africa to the deserts of the Middle East to the rice paddies of Asia — who now face the wrath of their own people and the very real possibility of being thrown out of power.

INTERACTIVE: THE G8/G20 SUMMIT IN TORONTO

As violence escalated leading to the break out of civil war in Libya, the situation in the region has become so volatile that some of the major news organizations now monitor developments day by day, hour by hour.

This interactive graphic takes a look at dictators of the last half-century, some of them already gone, some still in power but are facing the greatest challenge to their rule.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Also in this blog
Treating gunshot wounds
Ash tree-killing beetle
What animals mean when they ‘talk’
The world’s richest oil deposit
B-Baker’s last bombing mission
…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

Advertisements


One Response to “Not a time for dictators”

  1. Some key developments surrounding Mubarak’s stepping down from power:
    (1) Shortly afterwards, Egypt’s current prime minister Ahmed Shafiq told a private Egyptian television station that el-Fekky had resigned and that his resignation had been accepted.
    (2) Al Jazeera’s Sherine Tadros, reporting from Cairo, said the bans were likely to be welcomed by pro-democracy activists some of whom vowed to remain in the capitals Tahrir Square until their agenda for democratic reform is fully accepted.
    (3) People out on the streets at the beginning were very much calling for the end of the regime. They were saying they didn’t want any of these people to remain in Egypt.
    (4) After President Hosni Mubarak stepped down, the country will be looking for accountability, and that is what Egyptian authorities are now providing.
    (5) Questions now remain over how the militarys transition to civilian rule will take place.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: